Footed plate with warabi design, Ko-kunati ware in "Suisakate" style

$3,843.00

Footed plate with warabi design, Ko-kunati ware in "Suisakate" style
Footed plate with warabi design, Ko-kunati ware in "Suisakate" style
Footed plate with warabi design, Ko-kunati ware in "Suisakate" style
Footed plate with warabi design, Ko-kunati ware in "Suisakate" style
  • Region/Era Edo period, the second half of 17th century
  • Size H2.0×W15.0×D15.2 cm
  • Condition Three very small chips (about 1 mm) on the edge.
  • Accessory Wood box
  • No. 41NK-39

Suisakate," in which only a part of the iron glaze is left hanging while the entire surface is covered with iron glaze, is used to express patterns in white porcelain or underglaze blue.


Compared to "Sometsuke", there are far fewer of them and they are extremely rare, but many of them have stylish designs and are very popular.

This piece is one of the Suisakate works.

The first thing that catches the eye is the design of Warabi (bracken) expressed in white porcelain and underglaze blue on a glossy iron glaze.



The gradation of blue and white colors is beautiful and gives a sense of rhythm.


Warabi, a native of Japan, is a familiar plant to Japanese people.

The newly sprouted, rounded ends of the plant are called “Sawarabi (early Warabi)," and it appears in the Manyoshu, a Japanese anthology of poetry, as a season word that heralds the coming of spring.

In the Edo period (1603-1868), when this work was created, Rimpa artists used Warabi in many of their paintings and craft designs.

The elegant designs created by the Rimpa school were very popular at the time, which suggests that porcelain made in Kyushu (southernmost of the four main islands of Japan), such as this piece, was influenced by them.

The similar type of suisakate is thought to have been produced around 1650-1660, and is classified as Ko-kutani, but due to its elaborate workmanship and elegant design, it is sometimes considered “Matsugatani," which preceded Nabeshima, according to some studies. 

The ridge-and-flower mold is sharp and thin, and when turned over, the serpentine base is carefully crafted with three legs around it.


 

[Additional note]

Additional photos will be added regarding the condition.

There are three very small chips of about 1 mm in size on the edge of the rim.

The photo was taken by magnifying the image with a loupe, and the fixation is so small that it is difficult to be confirmed with the naked eye.

To pick up and see the actual item in the gallery.

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